Nobel Prize Storyteller

I read this article and it strikes me the millions of reasons we all have for choosing to tell stories and then also wondered why people would then choose not too. Regardless of who we are, our loves, lives, backgrounds, our stories are possibly the most important part of who we are and what makes us what we are. Sometimes a story needs to be told at a particular time, maybe years after we’ve locked it away, even forgetting it’s there and then something happens that reveal that it’s time the story is retold.

Have a quick perusal at the following article and drop me a line with your reasons for telling your stories.

Mara x

 

STOCKHOLM – Chinese writer Mo Yan, winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Literature, described himself as a storyteller in a lecture at the Swedish Academy on Friday afternoon.

It is telling stories that earned him the prize, the Nobel laureate said.

 

Mo Yan gives Nobel Prize speech

The 2012 Nobel Literature Prize laureate Mo Yan of China speaks during the traditional Nobel lecture at the Royal Swedish Academy December 7, 2012. [Photo/Agencies]

 

In the lecture titled “Storytellers,” he talked about how he started story telling as a child and shared with the listeners his memory of his childhood and mother, “the person who is most on my mind at this moment.”

“As repayment for mother’s kindness and a way to demonstrate my memory, I’d retell the stories for her in vivid detail,” said Mo Yan.

He also recalled memories of being surrounded by adults instead of children of his age after he dropped out of school, which “created a powerful reality” in his mind and later became a part of his own fiction.

By introducing the background of his most famous works such as “Frog,” “Life and Death are Wearing Me Out,” “Big Breasts and Wide Hips,” “The Garlic Ballads”, “Sandalwood Death” and “The Transparent Carrot,” Mo Yan shared the inspiration behind the stories and the way they were produced.

“Many interesting things have happened to me in the wake of winning the prize, and they have convinced me that truth and justice are alive and well,” said Mo Yan.

“So I will continue telling my stories in the days to come,” he said at the end of his lecture.

 

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